Dr Ami Seivwright

Postdoctoral Fellow

Dr Ami Seivwright is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Social Impact UWA. She is an experienced, primarily qualitative researcher. Her PhD research examined how and why employees engage in acts of social responsibility at work.

Her research at CSI focuses on complex social problems, such as homelessness and entrenched disadvantage, and outcomes measurement - including enhancing understanding among not-for-profits about how best to measure the difference they make and the measurement of socioeconomic outcomes at the subregional level. Examples of these research projects include Journey to Social Inclusion and 100 Families WA.

Ami’s key skills include research design, qualitative research methodologies and analysis, basic quantitative analysis, and writing (academic and general audience).

She holds a PhD and a Bachelor of Commerce (Hons) in Human Resource Management from The University of Western Australia.

ami.seivwright@uwa.edu.au

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